Student Sustainability Collective: Public Health

As a mother and an educator living near the largest urban oil field in the country, I am deeply concerned about fracking. I have seen a disproportionate increase in our communities health issues such as numerous reported cases of cancers and increased asthma rates. It is shocking know this is happening.

Ronda Brown

Ronda lives in Los Angeles, and knows first hand about the impact of fracking on her community. That’s why she joined our campaign to ban fracking in California. Will you stand with Ronda, along with thousands of people all over California, and help organize for a state-wide ban on fracking?

On May 15, Food & Water Watch officially launched the "Ban Fracking in California" campaign in Los Angeles, from a location in Baldwin Hills overlooking the Inglewood Oil Field - the largest urban oil field in the country. Over the next year, we will be organizing in communities all over the state to win local, and ultimately state-wide, bans on fracking.Will you join us by signing up to organize in your community and collect petition signatures asking Governor Brown to ban fracking?

We need your help reaching your friends and neighbors and educating them about the dangers of fracking. With your help, we’ll be able to send a strong message to Governor Brown that Californians don’t want to pay the exorbitant toll that fracking will take out our state. 

Via Food and Water Watch


Action Alert: Tell Eli Lily to Stop Pinkwashing!

Eli Lilly’s cancer drugs made $2,683,000,000 for the company in 2008. Its potentially carcinogenic dairy hormone made millions of dollars in the same year. That’s a highly lucrative profit cycle and one we call pinkwashing. We want to get rBGH out of our food supply completely, and we need your help to do it. Help keep the pressure on Eli Lilly — tell them to sign BCAction’s Pledge to Prevent Pinkwashing.
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Action Alert: Tell Eli Lily to Stop Pinkwashing!

Eli Lilly’s cancer drugs made $2,683,000,000 for the company in 2008. Its potentially carcinogenic dairy hormone made millions of dollars in the same year. That’s a highly lucrative profit cycle and one we call pinkwashing. We want to get rBGH out of our food supply completely, and we need your help to do it. Help keep the pressure on Eli Lilly — tell them to sign BCAction’s Pledge to Prevent Pinkwashing.


With one decision, the FDA can begin to rid food packaging of BPA for good

The federal Food and Drug Administration will announce its decision on whether to ban bisphenol A from food packaging by next weekend! Environmental Working Group, our supporters and many like-minded organizations have been fighting for this moment for years. But for just as long, the food and chemical industries - and their lobbyists - have been striving to make sure it never comes.

The food and chemical industries are so nervous about the FDA’s upcoming decision that one sympathizer went as far as to write and publish an outrageous fake strategy memo - purportedly from the environmental community - claiming that this potent synthetic estrogen is safe.

Let’s make sure that we get the last word! More than 79,000 EWG supporters have already sent their message to the FDA - but we need your help to reach our goal of 100,000 messages sent.

The FDA needs to hear from us right now - before it makes up its mind - that we want BPA out of our food packaging.

Click here to send your message to the FDA today. We want safe, healthy food.

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What Is “Pink Slime” And Why Is It In 70% Of Supermarket Ground Beef?
Earlier this year, McDonald’s made headlines when it said it would stop using ammonia-treated beef trimmings lovingly known as “pink slime” in its burgers. Now the former USDA scientist who coined the phrase is speaking out against the widespread use of the stuff — not because it’s unsafe, but because he feels like consumers are being deceived into paying for cheap filler.
"It’s economic fraud," the scientist explains, adding that you’ll find pink slime in 70% of ground beef you buy at the supermarket. "It’s not fresh ground beef. … It’s a cheap substitute being added in."
(source)

It’s a bit ironic that McDonald’s has beaten the USDA to the punch. Also, the USDA plans to buy 7 million pounds of “pink slime” for use in the national school lunch program. (source)
What you can do:Petition: Tell USDA to STOP Using Pink Slime in School Food!

What Is “Pink Slime” And Why Is It In 70% Of Supermarket Ground Beef?

Earlier this year, McDonald’s made headlines when it said it would stop using ammonia-treated beef trimmings lovingly known as “pink slime” in its burgers. Now the former USDA scientist who coined the phrase is speaking out against the widespread use of the stuff — not because it’s unsafe, but because he feels like consumers are being deceived into paying for cheap filler.

"It’s economic fraud," the scientist explains, adding that you’ll find pink slime in 70% of ground beef you buy at the supermarket. "It’s not fresh ground beef. … It’s a cheap substitute being added in."

(source)

It’s a bit ironic that McDonald’s has beaten the USDA to the punch. Also, the USDA plans to buy 7 million pounds of “pink slime” for use in the national school lunch program. (source)

What you can do:
Petition: Tell USDA to STOP Using Pink Slime in School Food!