Student Sustainability Collective: Public Health

pplm:

This past Saturday marked the one-year anniversary of the failed “Pence” vote in Congress that would have barred Planned Parenthood from participating in federal health programs.The attacks on women’s health haven’t stopped since then – but neither have we. In a time when lawmakers consistently put politics over women’s lives, we’re fighting to ensure that all women have access to affordable health care. Please SHARE if you stand with us.
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pplm:

This past Saturday marked the one-year anniversary of the failed “Pence” vote in Congress that would have barred Planned Parenthood from participating in federal health programs.

The attacks on women’s health haven’t stopped since then – but neither have we. In a time when lawmakers consistently put politics over women’s lives, we’re fighting to ensure that all women have access to affordable health care. Please SHARE if you stand with us.


I won't walk for Komen →

Here’s the link to a letter written by Former Komen supporter and Breast Cancer Action member. The writer speaks from personal experience about the flaws of Breast Cancer Culture, and the effects of politics and corporate involvement on the struggle to end the breast cancer epidemic.

Komen’s decision to cut funding to Planned Parenthood opened up my eyes to the current state of affairs in breast cancer. Too many breast cancer organizations are pinkwashers who exploit this disease to make a buck at any cost; have agendas that put politics and profits before patients; place too much emphasis on mammograms despite their demonstrated failure to reduce the death rate; and, repeatedly leave poor and underserved communities and women of color to fend for themselves.

This year, I opened my eyes and I am not going to ignore what I see. I stand firm in my decision to sever my ties with Komen for the Cure because I need to make a difference.

Click the link to read the whole thing!


thedailywhat:

Sex 2.0 of the Day: To coincide with National Condom Week, Planned Parenthood last week launched a new campaign that invites sex havers to “check in” after they finish (safely) bumping uglies.
Some 55,000 “smart condoms” were distributed by Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest to students at colleges in western Washington. Each condom has a QR code on the package that can be scanned with a smartphone to identify the user’s location.
A website, WhereDidYouWearIt.com, was set up to let people anonymous notify others where they did the horizontal mambo, and leave a short message about their experience.
“We hope the site promotes discussions within relationships about condoms and helps to remove perceived stigmas that some people may have about condom use,” said the Planned Parenthood branch’s new media coordinator Nathan Engebretson.
If you’re planning on engaging in one these, ahem, condom discussions, a good place to start would be how to wear one.
[livescience.]

An interesting condom-promoting idea set forth by Planned Parenthood to reach out to young adults in Washington. It allows people to anonymously share what’s usually considered taboo, and the more commonplace something is, the more people are willing to use it! View Larger

thedailywhat:

Sex 2.0 of the Day: To coincide with National Condom Week, Planned Parenthood last week launched a new campaign that invites sex havers to “check in” after they finish (safely) bumping uglies.

Some 55,000 “smart condoms” were distributed by Planned Parenthood of the Great Northwest to students at colleges in western Washington. Each condom has a QR code on the package that can be scanned with a smartphone to identify the user’s location.

A website, WhereDidYouWearIt.com, was set up to let people anonymous notify others where they did the horizontal mambo, and leave a short message about their experience.

“We hope the site promotes discussions within relationships about condoms and helps to remove perceived stigmas that some people may have about condom use,” said the Planned Parenthood branch’s new media coordinator Nathan Engebretson.

If you’re planning on engaging in one these, ahem, condom discussions, a good place to start would be how to wear one.

[livescience.]

An interesting condom-promoting idea set forth by Planned Parenthood to reach out to young adults in Washington. It allows people to anonymously share what’s usually considered taboo, and the more commonplace something is, the more people are willing to use it!